Advancing excellence in laboratory medicine for better healthcare worldwide

Doctor Gary L. MYERS selected to receive the 2020 IFCC-Robert Schaffer Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Development of Standards for Use in Laboratory Medicine


Milan, 24 April 2020
- The IFCC, the international leading organization in the field of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, is pleased to announce that Dr Gary L. MYERS (US), has been selected to receive the IFCC-Robert Schaffer Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Development of Standards for Use in Laboratory Medicine co-sponsored by NIST and CLSI. This award honours an individual who has made outstanding and unique contributions to the advancement of reference methods and/or reference materials for Laboratory Medicine to facilitate improved quality of clinical diagnostics and therapies, which would in turn lead to reduced costs and improved patient care. The IFCC is very pleased to acknowledge the support from NIST and CLSI in the recognition of scientists and educators with a distinguished career in this area.

Dr Myers has been involved in the development and implementation of standards for laboratory medicine methods: he developed the CDC cholesterol reference method laboratory network and he led the CDC lipid standardization programme for more than 30 years. The development of the reference measurement procedure, reference materials and reference method laboratory network for cholesterol, in accordance with ISO standards, has served as the exemplar for the standardization of many clinically important biomarkers. Dr Myers supported several such programmes, working with international organizations, including AACC, NKDEP, ISO and IFCC. He was a key contributor to the USA National Reference System for the Clinical Laboratory developed in the 1980-1990 time frame by the CDC, NIST and CLSI. Dr Myers was the chair of the CLSI C37 guideline to prepare commutable serum pools for use as calibrators in calibration hierarchies originally for cholesterol and subsequently expanded for many analytes. He chairs the ICHCLR Council, which has developed policies and procedures to evaluate the need for and feasibility of achieving method standardization / harmonization for any clinically important biomarker.

Prof. Maurizio FERRARI, IFCC President and Chair IFCC Awards Committee, said: "We are delighted in selecting Dr Gary L. MYERS for the IFCC-Robert Schaffer Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Development of Standards for Use in Laboratory Medicine. He has a remarkable career in the field of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, and his efforts in delivering education in laboratory medicine by tailoring contents and formats effective for individuals across so many countries is unprecedented. I really believe that Dr Myers is a most worthy recipient of the 2020 IFCC-Robert Schaffer Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Development of Standards for Use in Laboratory Medicine.

The 2020 IFCC Awardees are a witness of the contribution that IFCC gives to advancement of excellence in laboratory medicine for better healthcare worldwide. Doctor Myers, along with nine other IFCC Distinguished Award winners, will be formally announced on Wednesday 6th January 2021 at the Opening Ceremony of the 24th WorldLab - IFCC International Congress in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine to be held in Seoul (South Korea) from 6th to 10th January 2021.

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ABOUT IFCC

IFCC is the leading organization in the field of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine worldwide. Through leadership and innovation in science and education, IFCC strives to enhance the scientific level and the quality of diagnosis and therapy for patients throughout the world. IFCC builds on the professionalism of its members to provide quality services to patients. IFCC is a Federation of 93 Full Member and 17 Affiliate member Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine representing more than 45.000 individual clinical chemists, laboratory scientists, and laboratory physicians and 48 Corporate Members covering the major areas of clinical laboratory developments. For further details please contact: ifcc@ifcc.org.

ABOUT CLSI

A not-for-profit membership organization, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) brings together the global laboratory community for a common cause: fostering excellence in laboratory medicine. We do so by facilitating a unique process of developing clinical laboratory testing standards based on input from and consensus among industry, government, and health care professionals. As an international organization, our members include 1,400+ organizations and 400+ individuals that come from over 60 countries. Through our unified efforts, we set and uphold the standards that drive quality test results, enhance patient care delivery, and improve public health around the world. For nearly 50 years, our members, volunteers, and customers have made CLSI a respected, transformative leader in the development and implementation of medical laboratory testing standards. Standardization in the laboratory improves the quality and efficiency of testing, which ultimately improves patient care outcomes.


ABOUT
NIST

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and is now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation's oldest physical science laboratories. Congress established the agency to remove a major challenge to U.S. industrial competitiveness at the time - a second-rate measurement infrastructure that lagged behind the capabilities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and other economic rivals. From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Today, NIST measurements support the smallest of technologies to the largest and most complex of human-made creations -from nanoscale devices so tiny that tens of thousands can fit on the end of a single human hair up to earthquake-resistant skyscrapers and global communication networks. Visit: https://www.nist.gov/

 
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